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Dog Obesity in the UK 2017

Is your dog carrying a little extra weight? It’s time to get them back in shape – See below our tips to maintain your dog's health.

Infographic dog obesity uk 2017

 

Here are our top 10 tips you can use to help your furry friend shed the pounds!

  • Start a food diary.
    Record everything your dog is having to eat, including treats and table scraps. Sometimes it simply helps to see where the extra calories might be coming from, as it can help you to recognise unhealthy habits (e.g. extra nibbles when friends and family visit!).

  • Measure their portions.
    Weighing your dog’s food will make sure you’re not feeding them more than they need. Your vet will be able to give you advice about how much your furry friend needs based on their breed, age and size.

  • Switch to a lower calorie dog food.
    Specialist weight management pet foods for dogs are readily available, and can help your pet to feel satisfied even as they cut down on calories.


    • Iams Proactive Health Light Sterilised / Overweight Dogs
      • Healthy Digestion: Tailored fibre blend, which includes Prebiotics and beet pulp
      • Healthy Heart: There are 7 essential nutrients that nourishes the heart
      • Healthy Weight: Formulated to help your dog stay at a healthier weight
      • Strong Immune System: Enriched with antioxidants

    • Royal Canin Canine Obesity Management
      • Low calorie, so the size of your dog's meal can stay the same
      • high in protein and low in carbs to satisfy your dog's hunger without giving them too much extra energy
      • Special ingredients also support your dog's bones and joints
      • Packed with nutrients to keep your dog healthy as they lose weight

    • Hill's Prescription Diet Canine
      • fat and calorie levels reduced for a healthier diet
      • aids your dog’s natural ability to breakdown fats thanks to L-carnitine and balanced fibre mix
      • contains antioxidants, clinically proven to fight free radical formation
      • magnesium and sodium counts are less than 1%, which promotes a health bladder.

  • Make sure they aren’t being fed elsewhere.
    It’s easy to tell if anybody is slipping your dog extra treats but you are never too sure. Well-meaning neighbours might not be aware that they’re compromising your dog’s health by treating them to extra meals. If your dog wears a collar, a “Please don’t feed me!” tag might do the trick.

  • Avoid human food.
    It can be hard to resist those puppy dog eyes, but stay strong – much as we love to treat our pets, they have very different nutritional needs to us, so sharing our dinner won’t do their health any favours.

  • Weigh your pet regularly.
    This will help you to track their progress. Weigh your small dog by firstly standing on the scale yourself, and then hopping on with them – the difference is your pet’s weight.

  • Help your dog to eat more slowly. If your pet tends to wolf down their dinner in one, a slow feeder bowl can help them to slow down and digest their food more fully.

  • Make mealtimes into a game.
    Hide your dog’s food in their favourite toy to make them work a little harder for their reward. This will encourage them to burn energy by exercising and playing.

  • Be patient.
    Healthy weight loss takes time, but it’s worth it! The safe rate of weight loss for your dog is approximately 1-2% of their bodyweight per week. Your vet will be happy to help you set realistic slimming goals for your pet.

  • Increase exercise.
    Last but certainly not least – increasing exercise is an essential part of keeping your dog’s health in check. You can increase your furry friend’s activity levels in loads of ways – most cats will love to chase a string or laser pointer around, and what dog would say no to more walkies and an extra game of fetch?


Sources:

The woofworks   |    PDSA   |    PFMA   |    Wikipedia    |    petdoctors